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Andres Segovia Masterclass Videos

Segovia doesn’t even let the student finish a piece before jumping in. Way different from a typical masterclasses today, this is more like a very intense, one-off coaching session. The video below is only the first part of this performers time with Segovia, but the rest is on youtube as well: part 2, part 3, and part 4.

The next video is Michael Lorimer performing Albeniz for Segovia. Again, this is only the first part: Michael Lorimer and Segovia (part 2).

Here Segovia teaches the Castelnuovo Tedesco Tarantella.

For those of you interested, this entire 1965 masterclass is on youtube. Some of the names that pop up as students are people that became prominent guitarists later on: Michael Lorimer (see above) and Oscar Ghiglia.

Michael Chapdelaine is very well known for his Segovia masterclass experience because Chapdelaine got kicked out. The other side of the story that never gets told is that Segovia and Chapdelaine got along fine during other parts of the 1986 USC masterclass.

Any other Segovia masterclass videos on youtube? Which ones are you favorites?

8 Responses leave one →
  1. 2010 December 29

    As I understand it, Chapdelain was dismissed from one particular session, not the entire class. The problem was that he chose to play a transcription done by Segovia (Albeniz’ Mallorca I think) and then decided to redo much of the fingering. Segovia’s simple question was why don’t you create your own transcription instead of using mine? Fair enough in my opinion. Of course Segovia might seem a bit eccentric by today’s standards but remember that you are talking about an artist who was arguably one of the top 5 or 10 performers of the whole 20th century!

    I think it’s also interesting to note that in your interview of Chapdelain he suggested that guitarists would do well to play more like Segovia did!

    I think it’s also important to point out that many of the participants in the classes not only went on to become great performers but also highly influential teachers. Ghiglia taught in Aspen during the summer for many years and many of his students have gone on to be highly successful performers and teachers (Fisk and Isban to name a couple).

  2. 2010 December 29

    There are some great videos of Segovia giving interviews, talking about his early career and getting his first concert guitar from Ramirez. Back then, it sounded like life was adventerous and care free for him. It would be great for more guitarists to embrace that kind of spirit.

  3. 2012 June 26
    Paul permalink

    Ah yes Andres Segovia….
    The problem with Segovia, is that most people believe what they want about him, and project things onto this “Icon, which Segovia has become”.

    Andres Segovia has become an icon of spoken and written propaganda, to the extent that people simply link “technical finesse, true musicianship, artistic power” with Segovia – often without even knowing a lot about him (and his performances – often of inferior quality, etc.).

    People often don’t even know that there is a lot of controvery and Criticism of Segovia.
    To learn more, have a look here:

    Andres Segovia Criticism (link)

    Don’t be like the feeble-minded people, who only think of Segovia as an Icon, and when asked for their favourite guitar player blabber out without thinking: “Segovia”

    • 2012 June 27

      I have nothing to add this this other than a hearty, “I agree”

    • 2012 August 2
      Andrew permalink

      I also agree.
      Segovia was completely overexposed, particularly in the US.

      And most people don’t know anything about Segovia, except that they repeat the fairytale “Segovia – one of the best guitarists of all times”.
      If they knew most of his recordings, they’d know better.

  4. 2013 February 3
    edward permalink

    Yes Segovia overstayed his ability and soldiered on despite a greatly compromised technique. I saw him at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia, sold out , close to are at 90, and it was a happening, with men in tux holding cocktails with their ladies in gowns finding their seats.: they had come to see a legend. How did he do it? By projecting an aura of a great artist but mostly riding the tide of history that saw at the conclusion of WWII in which the government had commandeered all manufacturing capability in a total war effort, creating a huge pent up demand for consumer goods, and which included new developments in stereophonic reproduction much superior to pre-war and mostly the 12″ vinyl disc which introduced his magical sound to a mass audience: it was the sound of a guitar that was beyond what anybody had ever heard. Whatever the querulous backbiting of shallow minds quibbling over rubato and musicianship now seek to expose the supposed fraud, his discography stands as a testament to his artistry. Fashions change, but no one yet has appeared to cast a shadow comparable to that of Andres Segovia.

  5. 2013 February 6
    edward permalink

    Guess pro-Segovia comments are not welcome here.

    • 2013 June 9

      More like: comments are held for moderation. They get published when I get to them. Sometimes it takes a while — as in this case.

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